OECD resources in Taylor Library and online

OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) is an international organisation of governments that work together to “understand what drives economic, social and environmental change. It measures productivity and global flows of trade and investment. It analyses and compares data to predict future trends. It sets international standards on a wide range of things, from agriculture and tax to the safety of chemicals.” (OECD website)

As the above definition suggests, the OECD collection can provide valuable data for researchers in a wide variety of disciplines. The library services at University of Aberdeen provide access to students and academic staff to the OECD collection on paper  in Taylor Library, or online, through the OECD iLibrary database.

OECD resources in the library

OECD

Taylor Library has an extensive paper collection of OECD documents on Floor 2 in Taylor Block D. We have a large selection of periodicals, books, pamphlets, reports and statistics. Items are catalogued differently in this collection; the shelfmarks have an OECD- prefix attached. The library holdings cover the years between 1961 and 2004. For documents after 2004, please use OECD iLibrary database.

OECD iLibrary 

The database contains all the publications and data-sets released by not only OECD but also the International Energy Agency, the Nuclear Energy Agency, the OECD Development Centre, PISA and the International Transport Forum.
It covers different subject fields from agriculture and food through economics, education, employment, energy, environment to health and social issues. From 1998 onwards, through OECD iLibrary, you can access:

  • 15 240 e-book titles
  • 77 950 chapters
  • 231 820 tables and graphs
  • 2 185 articles
  • 6 165 multilingual summaries
  • 6 370 working papers
  • 7 billion data points across 79 databases.

If you need help with this collection, please get in touch with us.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

Understanding citations – CASES

  1. INTERPRETING CASE CITATIONS

GENERAL RULES

What does case citation mean?

Case citation is a system of referencing by which legal professionals can identify a legal case heard and decided by one of the courts in the UK.
A full case citation starts with the Case name in italics followed by the neutral citation (where available) and/or the reference for  law report series where the case was published. The citation tells you where to find the case (in paper or online) if you need it.
For cases from Scottish and English courts, the citation usually has 3 distinct parts:

  • year
  • abbreviation (for the law report series in which the case was published)
  • page number.

Parallel citations

You may see more than one citation following the party names. These are parallel citations, and refer you to the case in different law report series. You do not need to find all the law reports which published the case to read it. You should use the most authoritative citation which is the first one right after the party names. Parallel citations offer an opportunity to find a case in different law reports if the library does not have the most authoritative source.

Neutral citations (case identifiers)

The neutral citations were introduced in the UK in 2001, and in Scotland in 2005. This system means that decisions of the superior courts in both Scotland and England are issued with unique judgement numbers. So, the last number after the abbreviation is not a page number but the identifier of the case.

courts-1

ANATOMY OF A CASE CITATION

scottish-cases

english-cases

neutral-citation

*Law reports are usually cited by abbreviation rather than the full title. Cardiff Index to Legal Abbreviations can help you understand the meaning of abbreviations for the titles of English language legal publications.

2. TRACKING DOWN CASES ON PAPER AND ONLINE

Law reports are available on paper in Block C and Block D of the Taylor Library. They are shelved by title in alphabetical order running down the right hand side of the lower level of the Library. The current parts of law reports are on the display stand near the entrance. All law reports are for reference use only.

For electronic versions of the law reports you have to consult the legal databases (Westlaw, Lexis Library, HeinOnline). Alternatively, you might want to check Primo, our resource discovery tool, for individual law report titles. (Do a ‘title search’ instead of a search by citation.) Please note that not all years are available for all law reports.
For more information on accessing and using legal databases, please read our library guides.

3. PRINCIPAL SERIES OF LAW REPORTS

SCOTLAND (this is not a comprehensive list of resources)

  • Session Cases (SC)
  • Scots Law Times (SLT)
  • Scottish Civil Law Reports (SCLR)
  • Scottish Criminal Case Reports (SCCR)
  • Scottish Criminal Law (SCL)
  • Green’s Weekly Digest (GWD)

ENGLAND (this is not a comprehensive list of resources)

  • The Law Reports

4 subseries within The Law Reports:

Appeal Cases (AC)
Chancery Division (CH)
Family (Fam)
Queen’s Bench (QB)*

  • Weekly Law Reports (WLR)
  • All England Law Reports (All ER)

*It can be King’s Bench (KB) – it changes with the monarch.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please visit the library or email us.

Taylor Library & EDC
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

Requesting books from the General Collections in the Taylor Library

Top of C stairs

The Taylor Library has an extensive book collection covering every area of the law, from legal theory through international law to private and public law. Our unique resources on Roman Law are well known not only for our university community, but for a wider audience as well. The popularity of this part of the collection is proven by overwhelming numbers of Inter Library Loan requests from all over the UK. The main book stock consists of books, monographs, folios, and pamphlets. This post offers help with requesting books from the General Collection.

The golden rule is that if an item is available in the library, there is no need to request it! Instead, collect your book from the shelf and take it to the Issue Desk where library staff can issue it for you.

How do you know if the item is in the library?

Please, go to Primo Advanced Search, login and click on the Books+ tab. We advise you to change the default settings in the Material Type scroll down menu from Any to Books, and in the Search Scope field to Libraries. Use the search boxes of the screen to perform a search adding the title and the name of the author in the search boxes.
Primo 2

On the search results page, click on the Availability tab under your selected title to see the status of the book.  If you find the message ‘On Shelf’ in the Status column, it means that the book is available in the library. A date displayed indicates that the book is on loan. (See image below)
Do not forget that you only have to request a book if it is on loan.
Results 3

How can you request a book if it is on loan?

In the Availability tab, check the Request Options column and click on the Request link next to the date. Simply follow the onscreen instruction to put a hold request on the title.

What happens when you request a book which is available in Taylor Library?

If you put a request on the book which is here in the library, our Library Management System would treat your action as an item request in another library, e.g. in the Medical Library. Please, only do this if you really want to collect your book there.

If you need further help or clarification, please contact us.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

Welcome to the Law Library

Welcome photo

The library team welcomes all new and returning students to Taylor Library. Once you’ve admired our brilliant new carpet, please wander around the shelves and check what we can offer to you.

The new book shelf is full with items acquired over the summer. The latest parts of the legal journals and law reports can be seen on our display unit. We have tidied the periodicals, the law report collection, as well as the general law book collection upstairs, and we are happy to report that quiet a few missing items were found, though not everything.

As a modern academic library, we can offer not only paper resources but e-books, e-journals and access to quite a few mainstream legal databases

Please follow the links, if you need information on library servicesfacilities and law resourcesOur guides provide quick help for any kind of library or resource related problems.

We are looking forward to seeing many of you in the library soon, and wishing you all the best of luck in the 2017/18 academic year.

Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

New books in Taylor Library

from-intercountry-adoption

Click cover to see Primo entry

 

 

February saw three new additions to the Taylor Library general book collection. See the list below for details and links to the book entries on Primo. You can also have a look at the Taylor new acquisitions page for a list of what has come in over the last three months.

February 2017
Author Title Publisher Shelfmark
Gill, Brian Agricultural tenancies*

*Previous editions titled Law of agricultural holdings in Scotland.

Edinburgh : W. Green/Thomson Reuters, 2017 346.41104348 GIL
McKendrick, Ewan Contract law Basingstoke : Macmillan Education/Palgrave, 2015 346.4202 MCK

 

Rotabi, Karen Smith From intercountry adoption to global surrogacy: a human rights history and new fertility frontiers London : Routledge, 2016 306.8743 ROT

Accessing reading lists through Primo

Primo, our special search engine provides excellent opportunities for you to discover all the resources we can offer. You can search for items (books, journal articles – both, physical or electronic -, images, audio visual materials, databases, etc.); save searches for later use; request or renew library materials. But, this is not all. Through Primo, you are able to check the reading lists of your courses.

Please follow the steps below to get access to Course Reading:

  1. Go to Primo and login with your University username and password
    (See screenshot below)login
  2. Click on Course Reading tab
  3. If you know the course code, type it into the first search box, and click on Search. Your results screen will display all the book titles our Library Management System recorded under the particular course code.

For example: Search for materials of the LS1025 course (Legal System). Follow the steps above, and your search results will return with 11 book titles:primo-loginClick on the Availability tab (underneath the book title) to see the Location of the item, its Call Number, Status or the Request Options.

4. If you do not know the course code, type the area of law covered by the course in the search box.
For Example: Use ‘Criminal law’ as a search term. Perform your search, and the results will display 195 book titles.

primo-3

  • From this screen, you have different options to narrow down the search results. To see them, please check the Refine My Results box on the left hand side of the screen:
    • Selecting the name of your lecturer, e.g. Prof Peter Duff will reduce the search results to 38 book titles.
    • Or, alternatively you can select a course code from the Course section, e.g. LS4035, and the results screen will show 17 book titles only.
    • Check other options of the Refine My Results box, such as Resource Type, Location, Collection sections, etc.

5. Once you have finished your search session, do not forget to Sign out.

TIP!!!

  • Always consult your course coordinator if you are uncertain about your readings.
  • Always check your course handout because lecturers are updating their reading lists every year, and your course handout contains the full list of resources you need to read. Our lists could be incomplete.
  • The Course Reading option of Primo is not a substitute for the reading list of your course handout.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Old books for contemporary readers

Garland 2

Readers can find an extensive collection of paper books on the second floor of the Taylor Library & EDC. Nowadays, when there is a significant shift from physical resources to online collections, our general law book collection is less busy than it was.

Undergraduate students mainly use Heavy Demand items on their course reading lists. These are textbooks, monographs, or anthologies of various fields of law. Dissertation time is probably the first time when many of them venture upstairs, and have a more thorough look around the general law collection. This is not the case with the postgraduate and especially research students who tend to use this collection more regularly. As they have to demonstrate a deeper knowledge of their chosen fields, they need more rigorous research and wider reading on their topics.

The general law collection is an ideal source of information. Covering almost every possible area of the law, it provides books, research papers, pamphlets, folios, etc. Not all materials are in English. The collection houses a quite unique Roman law section, with books written in Latin, German or French. The oldest books go back to the turn of the 19th century. [See Pandekten (1800) written by Carl Georg von Wachter (1797 -1880) and Oscar Eberhard Siegfried von Wachter (1825-1902)].

Among the old books, there are a few very well-known publications. If someone is studying law, some books are surely unmissable, like An institute of the law of Scotland: in four books: in the order of Sir George Mackenzie’s Institutes of the law by John Erskine (1695-1768); Commentaries on the law of Scotland respecting crimes by David Hume (1757-1838) or Principles of the law of Scotland by George Joseph Bell (1770-1843).

Of course, not all old books are as rare or as famous as the ones just mentioned. But all of them are important in their own way, and are excellent for historical studies or just providing a historical perspective for a given legal research. To rediscover the hidden treasures of the general law collection, and to highlight a few interesting items there, we are launching a new series of posts. Our aim is to introduce old books to contemporary readers.

The first book chosen is entitled The Court of Session Garland. It is an anthology compiled by James Maidment (1793-1879), and makes for a very lighthearted reading. The author was a prominent Advocate on genealogical cases and a friend of Sir Walter Scott. He also proved himself as a historian, poet and literary collector. Maidment’s personal library was so huge (more than 5000 items at the time of his death) that the auction for the sale of the collection lasted more than 15 sessions in 1880, and raised about £4,500. [See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

The Court of Session Garland is a collection of humorous writings (anecdotes, songs, sonnets, epigrams, literary sketches) written by – among others – Scottish lawyers of the era (lawyers, advocates, judges). The individual pieces were selected by Maidment, and then published by Thomas G. Stevenson in Edinburgh in 1839. Of course, the book is neither a serious legal nor a sophisticated literary work, its importance lies in its significance for cultural history. The book offers a fascinating and original insight into the life of early 19th century legal professionals. It sheds a humorous light on the Scottish Bar.

And, to spark your interest in the publication, here are a few quotes from the book:

I.

“EPIGRAM ON THE LATE HUGO ARNOT. ESQ. ADVOCATE.

Written by the Honourable Henry Erskine.

The Scriptures assure us much may be forgiven
To flesh and to blood, by the mercy of heaven ;
But I’ve searched all the books, and texts I find none
That extend such forgiveness to skin and to bone.*

*Hugo was so attenuated as to be almost a walking skeleton, – had he lived till the year 1825, he might have proved a formidable rival to the living skeleton of that period. One day he was eating a split dried haddock, commonly called a spelding, when the reputed author of these lines came in, – “You see,” says Hugo, “I am not starving,” “I must own,” observed Henry Erskine, “that you are very like your meat.”

II.

 “SONG,

BY WILLIAM ERSKINE, ESQ. ADVOCATE.

William Erskine, afterwards Lord Kinneder, was the son of the Reverend William Erskine, Minister of Muthil, -he was admitted Advocate in 1790, was appointed Sheriff-Depute of Orkney 6th June 1809, and promoted to the Bench, on the resignation of Lord Balmuto, on the 29th January 1822; -he died on the 14th of August following; -he was the intimate friend of Sir Walter Scott, and author of several small poems, amongst which are Supplementary Verses to Collins’ Ode on the Superstitions of the Highlands, which possess great poetical merit.

1.

O say not Cynthia, maid divine !
That vain our vows must ever prove,
That far from thee I still must pine,
For fortune is the foe of love,
And blissful dreams and visions bright.
Ah ! yield not to the fiend despair,
Nor dash with shades of deepest night,
The scenes our fancy form’d so fair.
Far, far from hollow splendor flee,
And live with innocence and me.

2.

Come, view the vale, my peerless maid,
Where lost to all but thee I dwell,
Where nature’s beauties deck the shade
That hides thy lover’s lowly cell.
See, peace, the cherub, wanders here,
See, independence guards my store,
And truth, and hope, and love are here,-
My Cynthia can’st thou wish for more ?
Then haste from hollow splendor flee,
And dwell with innocence and me.”

 

Now, you can read the parody of the previous poem here:

“PARODY ON THE PRECEDING,

BY GEORGE CRANSTON, ESQ. LORD COREHOUSE.

1.

O say not William, youth divine,
In vain your company I seek,
That far from me to-day you dine,
Tho’ you were ask’d on Thursday week.
Your leisure hours, your eves of rest,
O give not to some stupid drone,
Nor be the dull Dunsinnan’s* guest,
For you had better yawn alone.
Far, far from Lords of Session flee,
And dine with Thomson,† and with me.

2.

Come, view the meal, my peerless blade,
Which Annie’s gentle cares afford,
Two chickens from the Cowgate head,
To grace your George’s simple board,-
And peas,-the pudding crowns my cheer,-
Potatoes purchas’d at the door,
And greens, and tarts, and ham, are here,-
My William can’st thou wish for more?
Then haste, from Lords of Session flee,
And dine with Thompson and with me.”

* Sir William Nairn, Bart. Lord Dunsinnan,-his Lordship was admitted advocate 11th March 1755, made a Lord of Session 9th March 1786, and of Justiciary, 24th December 1792. He resigned the latter appointment in 1808, the former in 1809, and died at Dunsinnan House on the 20th of March 1811. He was uncle of the celebrated Katherine Nairn, who was convicted, 14th August 1768, of being art and part guilty with her brother-in-law, Lieutenant Patrick Ogilvie, of the murder of her husband, Thomas Ogilvie of Eastmiln, as also of an incestuous intercourse with her said brother-in-law. She, (by her uncle’s assistance, as was reported,) escaped from prison, and thus avoided the gallows; but her paramour was executed. In a Magazine for 1777 she is said to have taken refuge in a Convent at Lisle, “a sincere penitent”.

† Thomas Thomson, Esq. Deputy-Clerk-Register, and one of the Principal Clerks of Session.”

III.

“SONNET

TO PATRICK ROBERTSON, ESQ.

Patrick ! Thou whom no man or mother’s son,
From Rydal northward to thine own Strathspey,
The grave can better temper with the gay ;
Who art in truth a double-barrell’d gun,
One barrell charg’d with law, and one with fun ;
Accept the customary votive lay,
On this the festive, though the thoughtful day,
When time another cycle hath begun,
Spite of the working of “ the people’s bill,”
May thy quaint spirit long impart its zest
Unto thy daily life–making the year
One constant merry Christmas–seasoning still
The learning of the law with well-tim’d jest,
And meditation pale, with purple cheer.

W—— W—DS—TH.

R——- l M——nt,
Jan. 1836

Fishy

 

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

How copyright works – photocopying, scanning and downloading

copyright 1

Would you like to scan, photocopy or download library items but you are worried about
copyright violation?

Please, consult this quick guide, which explains the main categories of works currently protected in the UK, and the limits of photocopying, scanning or downloading.

The main categories of works covered by copyright:

  • Original literary works such as novels or poems, journal articles, letters, tables, lists and webpages
  • Typographical arrangements (i.e. the layout or actual appearance) of published editions
  • Original dramatic works such as opera, musical theatre dance or mime
  • Original musical works, i.e. the musical notes themselves
  • Original artistic works such as graphic works, paintings, drawings, photographs, jewellery, sculptures, maps, plans, blueprints and technical drawings
  • Sound recordings
  • Films
  • Broadcasts
  • Computer programmes and databases
  • Crown Copyright
  • Parliamentary Copyright

Under fair dealing, a general rule of thumb is that you can copy:

  • One chapter or 5% of a book, whichever is the greater
  • One complete article from a single issue of a journal
  • Up to 10% (maximum 200 pages) of a short book, pamphlet or report
  • One law report from a volume of judicial proceedings
  • One paper from a set of conference proceedings
  • A maximum of 10 pages or 5% of a poem, short story or other short literary work taken from an anthology of poetry or short stories

Remember that copyright violators are pursued vigorously by the right holders.

For more information, please visit our webpages on Copyright and read our library guide, Introduction to copyright.

If you have any question or you need assistance, please visit us in the Taylor Library & EDC.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the day: House of Commons Parliamentary Papers

 

UK Parliament

© Maurine. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Did you know that the library provides direct access to the House of Commons Parliamentary Papers (HCPP)?

The HCPP has different collections, e.g.:

  • 18th century collection (1688-1834),
  • 19th century collection (1801-1900),
  • 20th century collection (1901-2003/04 session),
  • 21st century module 1 (2004/05-2009/10 session),
  • Hansard (1803-2005).

Through the collections you can search more than 200,000 House of Commons sessional papers. To get access to the database, please follow the steps below:

  • Visit the library home page,
  • Use the quick search box of Primo, and type ‘House of Commons Parliamentary Papers’ in the search box and press enter,
  • Finally, to select the database from the result screen, click on ‘View online’ tab.

For more information, please read our Library Guide on the Official Publications Collection.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: Renewing items through Primo

 

Would you like to renew your loans?

You can easily do that online, just follow the steps below:

1. ‘Login’ to Primo using your University computer username and password. The login option can be found on the top right corner of the Primo home page.

renewal

2. Click on the ‘My Account‘ tab on the top right of the screen.

renewal 2

3. Select ‘Loans‘ from the My Account page.

4. You will see a list of all the books, journals or other library material that are currently
on loan to you.

5.If you want to renew all your library materials, click on the ‘Renew All‘ link (right
under the ‘List of Active Loans’ tab). This will automatically select all your items, and renew them.

6. If you want to renew some of your items, select the item(s) that you wish to renew
by ticking the boxes aligned with the titles, and then click on ‘Renew Selected‘ option.

Remember!

  • Heavy Demand items cannot be renewed on Primo. You must return them physically to the library.
  • 3 day loans will be automatically renewed by the Library Service up to nine times (subject to library rules and regulations). You will be notified by email whether
    the renewal was successful or not.
  • For any other items: self-renewal can be done from Primo provided the items
    have not been requested by someone else and you do not have outstanding fines.

Taylor Library Team