Understanding citations – LEGISLATION

STATUTES

  1. UK Parliament statutes

Statutes prior to 1963

Each piece of legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom is known as an Act of Parliament. In the citation of the Act, the number(s) before the letters represents the years of the reign of the monarch during which the relevant parliamentary session was held. Parliamentary sessions did not coincide with calendar years, and usually they spanned more than one calendar year.

For example

enough

The citation here means that The Railways (Extension Time) Act is the 18th Act passed during the session that started in the 31st year of the reign of Victoria and which finished in the 32nd year of that reign.

Modern statutes (since 1963)

Each modern Act of Parliament commences with a ‘Short Title’, which is a relatively brief name almost invariably used to identify the Act. The Short Title also includes the year of enactment. This is followed by a chapter number, which denotes the sequential number of the Act in the calendar year.

For example

new-statutes

The citation means that the Human Rights Act was the 42nd Act of Parliament passed in the year 1998.

2. Scottish Parliament statutes

The Scotland Act 1998 and the Scotland Act 2012 guarantee the power to the Scottish Parliament to create their own legislation in certain fields. Acts of the Scottish Parliament commence with a ‘Short Title’ (usually containing the word ‘Scotland’ in brackets and the year of enactment) followed by the acronym ‘asp’ (which stands for ‘Act of the Scottish Parliament’) and a number  (which increases consecutively from number 1 with each Act in the calendar year).

For example

scottish-act

This citation means that the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act was the 1st Act of the Scottish Parliament passed in the year 2016.

DELEGATED LEGISLATION

  1. UK Statutory Instruments 

The most familiar type of delegated legislation is the Statutory Instrument (SI). Statutory Instruments in the UK are centrally registered and issued with a number which resumes from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

si-1

2. Scottish Statutory Instruments

Each Scottish Statutory Instrument (SSI) made by the Scottish Government is in essentially the same form as the UK Statutory Instruments although cited using the prefix ‘SSI’. They are separately numbered, with the numbering resuming from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

ssi

If you have any questions or need assistance, please visit the library or email us.

Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

New Look Westlaw UK is live

Westlaw UK has recently undergone some major interface changes, refining many features and bringing the general look and feel in line with Westlaw International.

As before you should access Westlaw UK via Primo, our resource discovery tool. Users familiar with the previous Westlaw UK interface will have no trouble locating cases, legislation and articles etc, as the content header tabs are similarly displayed at the top of the page in the collections navigation bar. Clicking on any of the main content tabs opens up a second layer of tabs, providing in depth searching and browsing options. You can also search across all collections or browse by topic right from the home page. The Options button allows you to select specific collections to search across.

Westlaw UK new look homepage:

Westlaw UK new look homepage: The collections Navigation Bar, Options button and Browse by Topic highlighted

Cases

The Cases tab opens up to Cases Home in the second layer of tabs giving you the option to search for specific cases by Free Text, Subject/Keyword, Party Names or Citation. The next two tabs in the second layer provide browsing options, so you can browse by court or by law report series title.  The fourth tab allows you to search for Quantum Reports. This one is a new addition, stay tuned for updates.

WLaw2

Westlaw UK Cases Home page: Second layer of tabs highlighted at the top, and More Options for advanced searching

Legislation

Clicking the Legislation tab takes you to Legislation Home and allows access to a complete collection of consolidated UK, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish Acts and Statutory Instruments which you can browse or search directly. Clicking More Options at the bottom of the search box enables you to search across historical and prospective legislation. The rest of the second layer of tabs provides options to browse organized lists of:

  • UK Primary & Secondary legislation
  • UK Bills & Drafts
  • Policy & Guidance
  • Latest Legislation
  • Key Legal Concepts

Journals

The Journals tab is where you can find full text UK legal journal articles from major publishers such as Sweet & Maxwell, Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press.  You can also link to over half a million article abstracts from UK and EU legal journals.

Within any collection search page you can open up collection-specific advanced searching facilities by clicking on More Options at the bottom of the search box. This way you can refine your search to show only the most relevant results.

Westlaw UK’s document display pages include smartly organised links to a variety of supporting materials in the menu bar to the left of the display window. To the right of the display window are various Delivery options that allow you to email, print, download, you will also find options to organize documents using the Personalisation Tools:

Personalisation Tools

At the top of the Westlaw UK interface there are some features that allow you to personalise your research experience, such as: Favourites, Folders, History and Alerts. To make the most of the personalisation tools click on User Guides in the grey footer at the bottom of Westlaw UK and click Personalisations in the menu on the left side of the page for step by step instructions.

For more information and help using the database, Westlaw UK has a comprehensive User Guides section which you can access from within Westlaw via the link in the grey footer at the bottom of the page.

Our detailed library guides on Westlaw UK will be going live on the University Website later this week. And once term starts there will be regular library workshops on how to make the most of this resource.

Law subject resources – Public Information Online

8737200170_0975ecc980_o

© UK Parliament

Every law student knows the law databases very well. We do not need to introduce Westlaw, Lexis Library or HeinOnline to you. But, did you know that there are other useful databases which can help your studies and research? One of them is Public Information Online (PIO).

PIO is a full text database which provides access to Parliamentary publications from the Westminster Parliament, Scottish Parliament, Northern Ireland Assembly, National Assembly for Wales and Scottish Government. It also contains Non-Parliamentary material.

You can find all kinds of official publications through the database whether you want to track a Bill, read a debate in Hansard, find a Command Paper or read an overview of an Act. PIO allows you to see any UK Act dating back to 1988 and it’s amending Statutory Instruments.

One of PIO’s best known features is a directory, Civil Service Yearbook for detailed information on the structure, department and key personnel of the Civil Service of all central and devolved governments.

Online access to PIO database is available through Primo. Please login to Primo at the top right corner of the screen first, then on Primo Advanced Search, click on the ‘Find Databases‘ tab, and select letter ‘P‘ for Public Information Online.  If you are working from home, and you were presented with an authentication page, simple login with your university username and password, and start your search.

For more information, please read our Official Publications library guide or visit us in the Taylor Library.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

UK primary and secondary legislation

The present post gives you a short summary of the primary and secondary legislation in the United Kingdom in accordance with the Oxford University Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA, 4th edition).  It could be particularly useful for students who are writing their dissertations over the summer and want to cite UK legislation. For more information, please see pp. 23-28 in the OSCOLA user guide.

8737200170_0975ecc980_o

© UK Parliament

UK primary legislation:

  • Acts of the UK Parliament
  • Bills
  • Acts of the Scottish Parliament
  • Scottish Parliament Bills
  • Acts of the Welsh Assembly (previously known as Welsh Measures)
  • Welsh Assembly Bills
  • Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly
    (or previously, Acts of the Parliament of Northern Ireland)
  • Bills of the Northern Ireland Assembly

UK secondary legislation:

  • UK Statutory instruments (previously known as Statutory rules, regulations
    or orders)
  • Rules of court
  • Statutory instruments of the Welsh Assembly
  • Statutory instruments of the Scottish Parliament
  • Northern Ireland statutory rules.

 

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Finance (No.2) Act 2015

Westlaw logo

The Finance (No.2) Act 2015 is now on Westlaw UK with all amendments and commencement information.

Westlaw UK aims “to publish all new legislation the morning after publication, with new amendments highlighted within 48 hours. Case digests are written for the most influential cases on the day the judgment is delivered, with Status Icons of all the affected cases updated within 24 hours.”

Elaine Shallcross
Information Consultant, Law & Business
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk

Law School lecturer Malcolm Combe article on Scottish Land Reform in The Conversation

Inveraray castle

Inveraray Castle. © Copyright Englishpointers and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Malcolm Combe, of the University of Aberdeen’s School of Law, was recently published in The Conversation, on the subject of the Land Reform (Scotland) Bill. The article addresses concerns that the bill, if passed, would enable the Scottish government to force land owners in to selling, under certain conditions. The Duke of Argyll, owner of Inveraray Castle and estate, is one of those concerned about the implications of the bill.

Malcolm was an adviser to the Land Reform Review Group, and chair of a recent discussion event on the subject here at the University of Aberdeen.

You can track the progress of the Land Reform (Scotland) Bill on the Scottish Parliament website.

Have a look at Malcolm’s other publications on his staff profile, and also, check out his blog!