New books in Taylor Library

See below for a selection of highlights from our July acquisitions. An excerpt from the publishers description follows the bibliographic details. Click on the shelfmark links to view the book records on Primo.

You can also view the complete list of the last three month’s acquisitions here.

Failure to flourish: how law undermines family relationships
Clare Huntington
Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2014
346.73015 HUN

“Exploring the connection between families and inequality, Failure to Flourish: How Law Undermines Family Relationships argues that the legal regulation of families stands fundamentally at odds with the needs of families. Strong, stable, positive relationships are essential for both individuals and society to flourish, but from transportation policy to the criminal justice system, and from divorce rules to the child welfare system, the legal system makes it harder for parents to provide children with these kinds of relationships, exacerbating the growing inequality in America” (OUP)

Tallinn manual 2.0 on the international law applicable to cyber operations
Michael N. Schmitt  (ed)
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2017
341.63 SCH

“The focus of the original Manual was on the most severe cyber operations, those that violate the prohibition of the use of force in international relations, entitle states to exercise the right of self-defence, and/or occur during armed conflict. Tallinn Manual 2.0 adds a legal analysis of the more common cyber incidents that states encounter on a day-to-day basis and that fall below the thresholds of the use of force or armed conflict.

The expanded edition of the Tallinn Manual, like its predecessor, represents the views of its authors, and not of NATO, the NATO CCD COE, its Sponsoring Nations, or any other entity. ” (CCDCOE)

The UK and European human rights: a strained relationship? 
Katja S. Ziegler (ed)
Oxford : Hart Pub., 2015
341.48094 ZIE

“The UK’s engagement with the legal protection of human rights at a European level has been, at varying stages, pioneering, sceptical and antagonistic. The UK government, media and public opinion have all at times expressed concerns about the growing influence of European human rights law, particularly in the controversial contexts of prisoner voting and deportation of suspected terrorists as well as in the context of British military action abroad. British politicians and judges have also, however, played important roles in drafting, implementing and interpreting the European Convention on Human Rights. Its incorporation into domestic law in the Human Rights Act 1998 intensified the ongoing debate about the UK’s international and regional human rights commitments. Furthermore, the increasing importance of the European Union in the human rights sphere has added another layer to the relationship and highlights the complex relationship(s) between the UK government, the Westminster Parliament and judges in the UK, Strasbourg and Luxembourg.

The book analyses the topical and contentious issue of the relationship between the UK and the European systems for the protection of human rights (ECHR and EU) from doctrinal, contextual and comparative perspectives and explores factors that influence the relationship of the UK and European human rights.” (Hart Pub)