OSCOLA – citing hard copy journal articles

 

OSCOLA final

If the article is available in print copy as well as online, cite the hard copy version. There is no need to cite an electronic source for such a publication.

The elements of citation are as follows:

  • Cite the author’s name first (followed by a coma)
  • Give the ‘title of the article’ (within single quotation marks)
  • Year of publication [in square brackets if it identifies the volume] or (in round brackets if there is a separate volume number)
  • The volume number if there is one
  • The name of the journal (in full or abbreviated form – with no full stops)
  • And the first page of the article.

Examples:

Carmen Draghici, ‘Immigration Tribunal fees as a barrier to access to justice and substantive human rights protection for children’ [2017] PL 1

John Gardner, ‘The Negligence Standard: Political not Methaphysical’ (2017) 80 MLR 1

Tip! Put a coma after the first page of the article if there is a pinpoint:

JAG Griffith, ‘The Common Law and the Political Constitution’ (2001) 117 LQR 42, 64.

For more information, please see page 37 in the OSCOLA user guide or visit us in the Taylor Library & EDC.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

Advertisements

Understanding citations – LEGISLATION

STATUTES

  1. UK Parliament statutes

Statutes prior to 1963

Each piece of legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom is known as an Act of Parliament. In the citation of the Act, the number(s) before the letters represents the years of the reign of the monarch during which the relevant parliamentary session was held. Parliamentary sessions did not coincide with calendar years, and usually they spanned more than one calendar year.

For example

enough

The citation here means that The Railways (Extension Time) Act is the 18th Act passed during the session that started in the 31st year of the reign of Victoria and which finished in the 32nd year of that reign.

Modern statutes (since 1963)

Each modern Act of Parliament commences with a ‘Short Title’, which is a relatively brief name almost invariably used to identify the Act. The Short Title also includes the year of enactment. This is followed by a chapter number, which denotes the sequential number of the Act in the calendar year.

For example

new-statutes

The citation means that the Human Rights Act was the 42nd Act of Parliament passed in the year 1998.

2. Scottish Parliament statutes

The Scotland Act 1998 and the Scotland Act 2012 guarantee the power to the Scottish Parliament to create their own legislation in certain fields. Acts of the Scottish Parliament commence with a ‘Short Title’ (usually containing the word ‘Scotland’ in brackets and the year of enactment) followed by the acronym ‘asp’ (which stands for ‘Act of the Scottish Parliament’) and a number  (which increases consecutively from number 1 with each Act in the calendar year).

For example

scottish-act

This citation means that the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act was the 1st Act of the Scottish Parliament passed in the year 2016.

DELEGATED LEGISLATION

  1. UK Statutory Instruments 

The most familiar type of delegated legislation is the Statutory Instrument (SI). Statutory Instruments in the UK are centrally registered and issued with a number which resumes from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

si-1

2. Scottish Statutory Instruments

Each Scottish Statutory Instrument (SSI) made by the Scottish Government is in essentially the same form as the UK Statutory Instruments although cited using the prefix ‘SSI’. They are separately numbered, with the numbering resuming from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

ssi

 

If you have any questions or need assistance, please visit the library or email us.

Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Day: OSCOLA – Subsequent citation of a case

OSCOLA finalIn the following example, we demonstrate the subsequent citation of a case. The short form of the case name must be sufficient to identify the source.

If the full name of the case is given in the text e.g. AWB Limited v Honourable Terence Rhoderic Hudson Cole, the citation is provided in footnotes as follows:

74 [2006] FCA 571.

76 AWB Limited (n. 74).

Interpreting the footnotes:

74 As the name of the case is given in your text, it is not given in the footnote.

76 For subsequent citation, a short form of the case is sufficient to identify the source along with a cross-citation to the full citation.

Note that it is also acceptable to give the full citation every time a source is cited, and the Law School may prefer this to the use of short forms. Always consult your supervisor or course coordinator if you are uncertain about referencing and citing using OSCOLA.

For more information, see Page 5 in the OSCOLA user guide. For more OSCOLA examples, please follow the link here.

Taylor Library Staff
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

OSCOLA – Tables and lists

OSCOLA final

Tip! You should always consult your course coordinator regarding the requirement to include tables of primary legal materials in your work. However, the general rule is that shorter works, such as articles and essays, only require footnotes.

At the end of a longer work (e.g. book, dissertation or thesis) you have to include the followings in this order:

  • List of abbreviations
  • Tables:
    • table(s) of cases
    • table(s) of legislation
    • tables other primary legal resources
  • Bibliography of secondary resources

As this post concentrates on the Tables only, you can find useful tips and a few examples here.

Table of cases

  • Cases should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word (except EU cases if they are divided by jurisdiction).
  • Case names are not italicized.
  • Unless there is a very small number of cases, divide the table into separate sections for different jurisdictions.

Example:
Assange v Sweden [2012] UKSC 22, [2012] 2 AC 471
Brightcrew Ltd. V City of Glasgow Licensing Board [2011] CSIH 46, 2012 SC 67
De Keyser’s Royal Hotel, Re [1920] AC 508
Hunter v Fox 1964 SC (HL) 95

Table of legislation

  • List every statute cited in your work. Legislation should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word of the title (not chronologically by date of enactment!)
  • Statutory Instruments should be listed separately, at the end of the statues. But, if you have a large number of citations of statutory instruments, it may be helpful to have wholly separate tables of statues and statutory instruments.
  • If legislation from more than one jurisdiction is cited, it may be helpful to have separate lists for each jurisdiction.

Example:
Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 12)
Defamation Act 2013
Fur Farming (Prohibition) Act 2000
High Hedges (Scotland) Act 2013 (asp 6)
Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977

Civil Legal Aid (Costs) Regulations 2013, SI 2013/611
Act of Sederunt (Lands Valuation Appeal Court) 2013, SSI 2013/161
Zoonoses (Monitoring) (Scotland) Regulations 2007, SSI 2007/420

Other tables

  • Table of international treaties and conventions,
  • Table of UN documents,
  • Table of official papers,
  • Table of policy documents.

For more information, please see pp. 10-12 in the OSCOLA user guide.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: OSCOLA – Bibliographies

OSCOLA final

 A bibliography lists all the secondary sources you cited in your essay or dissertation. It should be provided at the end of your work – after the main body of text, any appendices, and tables of primary sources that you have referred to.
Works in a bibliography are arranged in alphabetical order by the surname of
the first author.
Please note that references in a bibliography should include:
  • The author’s surname followed by his or her initial(s), with no comma
    separating them, but a comma after the final initial.
  • Only initials should be used.
  • Where there are more than 3 authors, give the first author followed by
    the phrase ‘and others’.
  • Titles of unattributed works should be preceded by a double em-dash
    (— — title of work).

——————————————————————————————

Examples

Citation in a footnote:
15 Elisabeth Fisher, Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism
(Hart Publishing 2007) 15.

Citation in the bibliography:
Fisher E, Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism
(Hart Publishing 2007).

For more information, see pages 11-12 in the OSCOLA User Guide or consult the Library’s quick guide on citing legal authorities.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

New Tip of the Day Service

TipWe are delighted to introduce a new service to help you make the most of the resources and services at Taylor Library. The ‘Tip of the Day’ service will be launched before the start of the next exam period.

From the middle of April, we will deliver useful tips to you regarding:

  • Library services
  • Legal databases
  • Other online resources (e-books, e-journals)
  • Official publications
  • Technical support
  • And much, much more…

We hope you will find this daily service advantageous for your study and research.

 

Taylor Library& EDC Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Permanent links to sources in HeinOnline save time and effort

HeinOnline has created permanent links to its libraries, individual titles, and even to pages in documents to help make research and referencing more efficient.

Creating a link to a library

hein-permalink1c

 

  1. Go to the HeinOnline Welcome Screen and right-click on the collection from the list of subscribed libraries.
  2. Depending on the web browser you use, choose one of the following options:

    Copy Link Location in Firefox
    Copy Shortcut in Internet Explorer
    Copy Link Address in Chrome
    Copy Link in Safari

  3. Paste the link accordingly.

Creating a link to a title

hein-permalink2b

 

It’s possible to obtain a URL from several different places but, from any of the following locations, simply right-click on the title and choose the appropriate link copying tool for your web browser (as outlined above):

  1. Do a Catalog Search for particular journal, e.g. Yale Law Journal, and right-click on the title from the result to obtain the link.
  2. Browse the alphabetical list of titles available from any collection’s homepage, and right-click on the title to obtain the link.
  3. If you already have the title open, right-click on the title name from the navigation trail.

Creating a link to a specific page

hein-permalink3c

 

  1. To obtain a permalink for a specific page use the Permalink button located in the toolbar above an open document. 
  2. A box will open from which you can copy and paste the full URL.
  3. NOTE: it is possible to do this for any page in HeinOnline.

Elaine Shallcross
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk