Tips for new postgraduate law students

IT problems

© CollegeDegrees360. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Are you a new postgraduate law student at the University of Aberdeen?  Do you have assignments to submit?

Here are some practical advice before submission:

Good luck with your assignments.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: finding e-books via Westlaw UK

1) List of books on Westlaw UK

To access books on the legal database Westlaw, go to the Library home page at www.abdn.ac.uk/library/ and type ‘Westlaw UK’ into the Search Our Collections box. Follow the link to Westlaw UK from the results screen on Primo and you will be prompted to log in with your University computer username and password through the Shibboleth authentication route.

There are 8 different tabs on the Westlaw UK website; go to Books. Westlaw will present you with a list of text books that we have access to in full text. Significant titles in the collection include:

  • Anton’s Private International Law 3rd edn.
  • Archbold Criminal Pleading Evidence and Practice 2018 edn.
  • Davidson: Arbitration 2nd edn.
  • Macphail’s Sheriff Court Practice 3rd edn. 
  • Palmer’s Company Law
  • Redfern & Hunter: Law and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration 6th edn.
  • Renton and Brown Criminal Procedure 6th edn.
  • The Law of Contract in Scotland 3rd edn.

Westlaw e-books

 

 

Click on a title and you will be given the choice to use the Free Text search box to a keyword search within the book, or to browse its contents through Mainwork.

2) If you come across an e-book while searching Primo…

Often a book can be available in different editions and different formats. These books are identified in Primo with the notation ‘multiple versions found’.

To understand this option, try the following search:

  1. Go to Primo and enter the following keywords into the search box under the Books+ tab:
    law contract Scotland McBryde
  2. Primo will find 2 records containing those words. The record for: The Law of Contract in Scotland by William McBryde appears to include multiple versions. View 4 versions
  3. Open the View 4 versions link.
  4. The results are ranked chronologically with the newest edition at the top.
  5. Underneath the top entry you will see the words: Online Access. This means that the book is available electronically. To access and read it, click on either the View Online tab or the book title. You may be asked to log in with your University computer username and password. Clicking on the title will take you to the Browse and Search screens within the book. 

multiple versions

Note: To obtain this book in paper format click on Availability. This will give you information about the location and availability of the item.

If you have any problems using Westlaw UK, please speak to a member of our team or email us at lawlib@abdn.ac.uk.

Taylor Library is open 9:00-22:00 most days. For more details see our opening times page.

 

Tip of the Day – Borrowing entitlement

beeeeewksLibrary users may borrow materials from the Sir Duncan Rice Library as well as from any of the site libraries, e.g. Medical Library or Taylor Library. The number of the items you can get depends on your membership category.

If you wish to know your borrowing entitlement, please consult the following list:

  • Undergraduate students: 20 loans
  • Taught Postgraduate students: 20 loans
  • Research Postgraduate students: 30 loans
  • Staff (including Honorary and Retired Staff): 50 loans
  • Temporary Services Staff: 10 loans
  • NHS Grampian Staff: 10 loans
  • External readers: 10 loans
  • SCONUL Access readers: 5 loans

Remember! University students and staff can get only two Heavy Demand books at a time, within their borrowing entitlement.

For more information, please follow the link here.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Working with Word 2013: activating the Navigation Pane

Activating the Navigation Pane

This option is useful when working with long documents as you may not always remember where a specific section is. First you need to give your document some headings.

  • Highlight and apply a style to your headings from the Styles group on the HOME tab.
  • Then go to VIEW (second last tab in Word 2013) and tick the Navigation Pane box in the Show group.
  • Navigate to a section by clicking on it in the Navigation Pane.

Tip of the Day: OSCOLA – Subsequent citation of a case

OSCOLA finalIn the following example, we demonstrate the subsequent citation of a case. The short form of the case name must be sufficient to identify the source.

If the full name of the case is given in the text e.g. AWB Limited v Honourable Terence Rhoderic Hudson Cole, the citation is provided in footnotes as follows:

74 [2006] FCA 571.

76 AWB Limited (n. 74).

Interpreting the footnotes:

74 As the name of the case is given in your text, it is not given in the footnote.

76 For subsequent citation, a short form of the case is sufficient to identify the source along with a cross-citation to the full citation.

Note that it is also acceptable to give the full citation every time a source is cited, and the Law School may prefer this to the use of short forms. Always consult your supervisor or course coordinator if you are uncertain about referencing and citing using OSCOLA.

For more information, see Page 5 in the OSCOLA user guide. For more OSCOLA examples, please follow the link here.

Taylor Library Staff
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Working with Word 2013: numbering pages differently in different sections

Inserting Roman numerals into the first section of your document and Arabic numerals into subsequent ones.

To make this work you need to split your document into two different sections, otherwise Word will apply one sequence of page numbers to the entire document. The process involves opening up the Header & Footer menu. This is where you normally go to add page numbers to your document.

  • Place your cursor right at the start of the second section (or the section with the main body of your text).
  • Go to PAGE LAYOUT and in the Page Setup menu, click on the drop down arrow for Breaks. Choose Next Page. starting-pic

If you want to see how this looks ‘behind the scenes’ click on the HOME tab at the start of the ribbon and click on the paragraph sign  under the Paragraph menu.

  • The document is now divided into two sections.
  • Still on the same page, double click at the top. This action opens up the DESIGN tab which, amongst other things, allows you to add page numbers in the header or footer of your document.
  • In the Navigation menu (still in DESIGN) the tab Link to Previous (=section) appears as active. Click on it to break the link with the previous section.
  • Go to the Header & Footer menu. Click on the drop down arrow for Page Number. Choose the style and location where you want your numbers to appear. design-tab
  • Not done yet! Word recognizes that the page you are on the xth page of your document and it gives it the relevant number. Without closing the DESIGN tab, go back to Page Number in Header & Footer and this time choose Format Page Numbers.  Select Start at: and type number 1 into the box (or whichever page number you want the main section of your text to start at). Click on OKstart-at
  • Scroll up and down to see how your page numbers look. Close the Header & Footer menu using the red x at the far right.

Now the Roman numerals…

  • Back to the first section of your document. (Press Ctrl and Home to be taken to the top.) Double click at the top of your document to bring up the Header & Footer.
  • Go to Page Number in the Header & Footer menu and click on the drop down arrow for Page Number. Again, choose the location where you want your numbers to appear and choose Roman style. If this is not immediately obvious, apply Arabic numbers then go back to Format; from there you can choose the Roman style. Select Start at: i and click on OKroman
  • Close Header & Footer. Well done!

How copyright works – photocopying, scanning and downloading

copyright 1

Would you like to scan, photocopy or download library items but you are worried about
copyright violation?

Please, consult this quick guide, which explains the main categories of works currently protected in the UK, and the limits of photocopying, scanning or downloading.

The main categories of works covered by copyright:

  • Original literary works such as novels or poems, journal articles, letters, tables, lists and webpages
  • Typographical arrangements (i.e. the layout or actual appearance) of published editions
  • Original dramatic works such as opera, musical theatre dance or mime
  • Original musical works, i.e. the musical notes themselves
  • Original artistic works such as graphic works, paintings, drawings, photographs, jewellery, sculptures, maps, plans, blueprints and technical drawings
  • Sound recordings
  • Films
  • Broadcasts
  • Computer programmes and databases
  • Crown Copyright
  • Parliamentary Copyright

Under fair dealing, a general rule of thumb is that you can copy:

  • One chapter or 5% of a book, whichever is the greater
  • One complete article from a single issue of a journal
  • Up to 10% (maximum 200 pages) of a short book, pamphlet or report
  • One law report from a volume of judicial proceedings
  • One paper from a set of conference proceedings
  • A maximum of 10 pages or 5% of a poem, short story or other short literary work taken from an anthology of poetry or short stories

Remember that copyright violators are pursued vigorously by the right holders.

For more information, please visit our webpages on Copyright and read our library guide, Introduction to copyright.

If you have any question or you need assistance, please visit us in the Taylor Library & EDC.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: Forgotten ID cards

forgotten cards

© Flood G. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

As a university member, you always need your ID card to enter the library. So, what happens if you leave it at home?

You have to request a Day Access Pass.  We will ask you to provide proof of identity and to fill in the necessary form. Remember, you will be allowed a Day Access Pass on 3 separate occasions in an academic year. Thereafter you must have your University ID card to visit us.

For more information, please read the Library Access Policy.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

OSCOLA – Tables and lists

OSCOLA final

Tip! You should always consult your course coordinator regarding the requirement to include tables of primary legal materials in your work. However, the general rule is that shorter works, such as articles and essays, only require footnotes.

At the end of a longer work (e.g. book, dissertation or thesis) you have to include the followings in this order:

  • List of abbreviations
  • Tables:
    • table(s) of cases
    • table(s) of legislation
    • tables other primary legal resources
  • Bibliography of secondary resources

As this post concentrates on the Tables only, you can find useful tips and a few examples here.

Table of cases

  • Cases should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word (except EU cases if they are divided by jurisdiction).
  • Case names are not italicized.
  • Unless there is a very small number of cases, divide the table into separate sections for different jurisdictions.

Example:
Assange v Sweden [2012] UKSC 22, [2012] 2 AC 471
Brightcrew Ltd. V City of Glasgow Licensing Board [2011] CSIH 46, 2012 SC 67
De Keyser’s Royal Hotel, Re [1920] AC 508
Hunter v Fox 1964 SC (HL) 95

Table of legislation

  • List every statute cited in your work. Legislation should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word of the title (not chronologically by date of enactment!)
  • Statutory Instruments should be listed separately, at the end of the statues. But, if you have a large number of citations of statutory instruments, it may be helpful to have wholly separate tables of statues and statutory instruments.
  • If legislation from more than one jurisdiction is cited, it may be helpful to have separate lists for each jurisdiction.

Example:
Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 12)
Defamation Act 2013
Fur Farming (Prohibition) Act 2000
High Hedges (Scotland) Act 2013 (asp 6)
Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977

Civil Legal Aid (Costs) Regulations 2013, SI 2013/611
Act of Sederunt (Lands Valuation Appeal Court) 2013, SSI 2013/161
Zoonoses (Monitoring) (Scotland) Regulations 2007, SSI 2007/420

Other tables

  • Table of international treaties and conventions,
  • Table of UN documents,
  • Table of official papers,
  • Table of policy documents.

For more information, please see pp. 10-12 in the OSCOLA user guide.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk