Using the UPSO e-books collection (Oxford University Press Scholarship Online)

UPSO is an important source of electronic books for law. We currently have access to content in this library until 2017 under a deal which includes publications from a number of UK and US university presses, including Oxford University Press. This database contains significant collections of books for public international law, constitutional and administrative law, philosophy of law, criminal law and criminology, human rights law and EU law, but many other law subjects are also included.

Access
1. Go to Primo
2. Select Find Databases
3. Click on ‘U‘ to see databases starting with this letter
4. Scroll down to University Press Scholarship Online and click on the database

Your search
1. Specify a subject area by clicking on Select next to Search my Subject Specializations (under  the search box).
2. Enter your search terms in the search box or use the advanced search option to         introduce more concepts to your search or to specify a year range.
3. When UPSO returns the results, locate the narrowing options on the left. Tick the Unlocked, Free and Open Access boxes and submit, to only see content that we have full text access to.

Your book
To read a book click on the title to open the record and select relevant chapters from the Table of Contents. You can read a full book online but under the terms of the license agreement an individual user is only permitted to download a PDF of one chapter from a book. Do this by clicking on the View PDF link for the chapter you wish to download. This link can be found at the top right hand side of the chapter.

Note:
When working off campus you must login through the link to the Access Management Federation on the database website. Choose University of Aberdeen, then enter your university username and password in the Shibboleth authentication screen.

Enjoy using UPSO!
We are here if you need any help.

Eleni Borompoka
Taylor Library & EDC
01224 272601
eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Tip of the day: House of Commons Parliamentary Papers

 

UK Parliament

© Maurine. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Did you know that the library provides direct access to the House of Commons Parliamentary Papers (HCPP)?

The HCPP has different collections, e.g.:

  • 18th century collection (1688-1834),
  • 19th century collection (1801-1900),
  • 20th century collection (1901-2003/04 session),
  • 21st century module 1 (2004/05-2009/10 session),
  • Hansard (1803-2005).

Through the collections you can search more than 200,000 House of Commons sessional papers. To get access to the database, please follow the steps below:

  • Visit the library home page,
  • Use the quick search box of Primo, and type ‘House of Commons Parliamentary Papers’ in the search box and press enter,
  • Finally, to select the database from the result screen, click on ‘View online’ tab.

For more information, please read our Library Guide on the Official Publications Collection.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: Lexis®Library revamped

LexisNexis logo

One of the most important legal databases, Lexis®Library has recently undergone a major redesign. LexisNexis, the database provider introduced changes at the end of 2015.

With the new service enhancement, Lexis®Library has a clearer display, a more sophisticated Home Page and more intuitive search facilities. The users have the option to search across ALL subscribed legal content, including Lexis®Library and LexisPSL.

The new Academic User Guide, provided by LexisNexis could help you learn more about
the changes.
To find out more about the database, please read our updated library guides:

Staff at the Help Desk in the Taylor Library are happy to provide further assistance.

Zita Szabo
Information Assistant
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

Notes on using SpringerLink e books

SpringerLinkThe SpringerLink database comprises collections of books, journals and reference works. It covers numerous disciplines from Architecture & Design to Social Sciences, and, among them, you can also find Law. A significant part of the law collection deals with contemporary problems of international law, environmental law, criminal law or legal theory. The database also provides a wide coverage across other law subjects.

SpringerLink is one of only a few publishers that permit you to lawfully download a whole book to you computer or mobile device, and keep it indefinitely for your own educational or research use.

Remember, downloading books for others is not allowed. Please only download what you need for the research, course or assignment you are working on – mass downloading to build up a library of your own is unfair on the publisher (and authors) and not permitted.

You might find the following instructions useful to get access to this database:

  1. Go to Primo
  2. Select Find Databases tab (on the top of Primo screen)
  3. Click on ‘S‘ to see databases starting with this letter
  4. Scroll down to SpringerLink, and click on the database
    – Using on-campus computers, you will be directed to the database at once
    – In case of off-campus access, you might be asked to log into the database
    (Please provide your University username and password)
  5. Once inside the database, check the ‘Browse by discipline’ section, and select Law 
  6. On the left hand side of the Law page, you can find different boxes:
    Deselect Include preview-only
    – Select Book from the ‘Type Content‘ box
    – Select English from the ‘Language‘ box (Of course if you wish to read books in
    other languages, you have to select the relevant language)
  7. Finally, you might like to check the Subdiscipline box to see the different law subjects the database, SpringerLink could offer to you.

From your result screen, click on the book title you would like to read or download, and follow the onscreen instructions.

Good discovery, reading and research, everyone!

Taylor Library Staff
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Finance (No.2) Act 2015

Westlaw logo

The Finance (No.2) Act 2015 is now on Westlaw UK with all amendments and commencement information.

Westlaw UK aims “to publish all new legislation the morning after publication, with new amendments highlighted within 48 hours. Case digests are written for the most influential cases on the day the judgment is delivered, with Status Icons of all the affected cases updated within 24 hours.”

Elaine Shallcross
Information Consultant, Law & Business
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk

LexisNexis announces upgrade to Lexis®Library

LexisNexis logoSubject to a successful release, a number of ‘cosmetic’ changes to Lexis®Library take effect on
Saturday 5th December.

LexisNexis have reported the following improvements to Lexis®Library:

  • A more intuitive search experience.The Explore search box moves to the heart of the homepage and includes content filters.
  • A tidier, bigger, better display of results. Single results list opens up the page, with filtering in one place and the option to deliver multiple documents.
  • The option to search across ALL subscribed UK legal content. In one place for the first time, including both Lexis®Library and LexisPSL content included in the search results.
  • Glossary searches move to the home page. Get quick access to over 3,300 legal terms.”

Please see the new Academic User Guide for updated product guidance.

Staff at the Help Desk in the Taylor Library are happy to help with any questions regarding the changes to Lexis®Library.

Elaine Shallcross
Information Consultant, Law & Business

Tip of the Day: Need to find a journal article on your reading list?

 Example:

 Neal Kumar Katyal, ‘Active Avoidance: The Modern Supreme Court  and Legal  Change’ (2015) 128 Harv. L. Rev. 2109

1) Start by finding the full name of the journal.

 To obtain the full title, go to Cardiff Index to Legal Abbreviations. Consult our  library guide if you need help with this resource. 

 2) Once you have the full name of the journal (Harvard Law Review in this example)  enter it in the Primo search box in the Advanced Search option and change  material type to Journals. Make sure you are in the Books+ tab. 

 Remember to log in to Primo before you start searching!

Primo Journal search

Click to enlarge

 3) The name of the journal will usually be at the top of your results list. Click on the SFX   button and ‘Open source in a new window’.

 ‘Read this now’ lists the databases through which we have access to this title,  including years of coverage.

 ‘Get this later’ will take you to the catalogue where you can find out if we have this  title on paper.

 4) Check the year coverage in the ‘Read this now’ section and click on GO to link out to  the appropriate database. (The one including the year you are interested in.)
Harvard Law  Review articles from year 2015 are obtainable through HeinOnline and
Lexis Library.

 5) Every database is structured differently but the general rule is that once in, you need
to try and find the list of years available, or the archive or, in the case of Westlaw
and Lexis the list of years in the Browse section.

 6) Check your citation again to make sure you are in the right year, then find the volume  (or issue number if there is one) and lastly, look for the page number.

 If you are not managing to find the article this way, still inside the journal (step 6) use the  search box and enter words from the title of the article! Always check your citation  thoroughly to make sure you have found the right article.

***

 Have a look at our PowToon slideshow on finding legal journal articles.
(Switch  Autoplay to ‘on’ to watch this presentation as a video.)
Warning: The Primo interface has slightly changed since this video was published.  However, the search mechanism is still the same.

 Please come and speak to us if you have any questions!

 Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk