Useful information to you for your first assignment – Library Exercise required by Legal System (LS1025) course

As a first year law student, you will be required to complete a mandatory Library Exercise in the Legal System course in late September. In this exercise, students have to come to the Taylor Library, and find answers to around 30 questions set by the School of Law. This activity introduces two very basic collections to you: the Law Report Series and Official Publications collections. It helps you navigate through legal cases and primary legislation, and it shapes your knowledge on legal terminology.

This is the very first assignment you have to face, and students are often overwhelmed by the challenge. To make the completion of the Library Exercise easier, and more successful, we put together the following list of instructions.

Cases

  1. Read the questions carefully! You will find questions related to court cases. To find the right answers, you need to know what the case citation means in a particular case.
  2. Decoding citation is not always straightforward, especially if you have never done this before. Please follow the hyperlink to get help with understanding case citation.
  3. In the Taylor Library, there are posters everywhere which can explain what the different abbreviations stand for. Look for posters like this at the end of the shelves.Abbreviation posters
  4. Once you know the meaning of the abbreviation, you are on the right track to find the resource you need. For example, if the abbreviation is SC, and you have figured out that this stands for Session Cases, then the next step is to locate this law report series in the library.
  5. Law reports are stored on the right hand side of the lower level in Block C and Block D, and they are arranged in alphabetical order.

Legislation

  1. Around half of the questions concern legislation. And, just as with legal cases, legislation also has its own citation regime. Please follow the link to learn more about citing legislation.
  2.  The Official Publications collection which contains the resources you need is found at the back of  lower Block D, on the right hand side. Block D downstairs
  3. In order to answer the questions, you will need these publications:Statutes
  4. There are always a few questions concerning the Current Law Statutes Annotated collection which can be found on the lower level in Block C, opposite the Help Desk.

TIPS!

  • This is an individual assignment and not group work. Please work alone, and ask the library staff, and not your fellow students, if you need help.
  • Certain resources are stored downstairs in Block D. We would like to remind you that it is a Silent Study Zone, so talking is not allowed there.
  • And finally, this is a paper exercise. You are expected to find the answers in the library and not online. Please try to avoid using electronic legal databases.

We hope that this exercise will be a pleasant and rewarding experience. Do not worry if you cannot find the answers right away, you still know where you can find us. Please, come to the Help Desk or to the Issue Desk in the Taylor Library, and do not be afraid to ask for help.

Good luck with your Library Exercise!

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

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UK primary and secondary legislation

The present post gives you a short summary of the primary and secondary legislation in the United Kingdom in accordance with the Oxford University Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA, 4th edition).  It could be particularly useful for students who are writing their dissertations over the summer and want to cite UK legislation. For more information, please see pp. 23-28 in the OSCOLA user guide.

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© UK Parliament

UK primary legislation:

  • Acts of the UK Parliament
  • Bills
  • Acts of the Scottish Parliament
  • Scottish Parliament Bills
  • Acts of the Welsh Assembly (previously known as Welsh Measures)
  • Welsh Assembly Bills
  • Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly
    (or previously, Acts of the Parliament of Northern Ireland)
  • Bills of the Northern Ireland Assembly

UK secondary legislation:

  • UK Statutory instruments (previously known as Statutory rules, regulations
    or orders)
  • Rules of court
  • Statutory instruments of the Welsh Assembly
  • Statutory instruments of the Scottish Parliament
  • Northern Ireland statutory rules.

 

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Understanding citations – LEGISLATION

STATUTES

  1. UK Parliament statutes

Statutes prior to 1963

Each piece of legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom is known as an Act of Parliament. In the citation of the Act, the number(s) before the letters represents the years of the reign of the monarch during which the relevant parliamentary session was held. Parliamentary sessions did not coincide with calendar years, and usually they spanned more than one calendar year.

For example

enough

The citation here means that The Railways (Extension Time) Act is the 18th Act passed during the session that started in the 31st year of the reign of Victoria and which finished in the 32nd year of that reign.

Modern statutes (since 1963)

Each modern Act of Parliament commences with a ‘Short Title’, which is a relatively brief name almost invariably used to identify the Act. The Short Title also includes the year of enactment. This is followed by a chapter number, which denotes the sequential number of the Act in the calendar year.

For example

new-statutes

The citation means that the Human Rights Act was the 42nd Act of Parliament passed in the year 1998.

2. Scottish Parliament statutes

The Scotland Act 1998 and the Scotland Act 2012 guarantee the power to the Scottish Parliament to create their own legislation in certain fields. Acts of the Scottish Parliament commence with a ‘Short Title’ (usually containing the word ‘Scotland’ in brackets and the year of enactment) followed by the acronym ‘asp’ (which stands for ‘Act of the Scottish Parliament’) and a number  (which increases consecutively from number 1 with each Act in the calendar year).

For example

scottish-act

This citation means that the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act was the 1st Act of the Scottish Parliament passed in the year 2016.

DELEGATED LEGISLATION

  1. UK Statutory Instruments 

The most familiar type of delegated legislation is the Statutory Instrument (SI). Statutory Instruments in the UK are centrally registered and issued with a number which resumes from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

si-1

2. Scottish Statutory Instruments

Each Scottish Statutory Instrument (SSI) made by the Scottish Government is in essentially the same form as the UK Statutory Instruments although cited using the prefix ‘SSI’. They are separately numbered, with the numbering resuming from ‘No. 1’ at the start of each calendar year.

For example

ssi

 

If you have any questions or need assistance, please visit the library or email us.

Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Finance (No.2) Act 2015

Westlaw logo

The Finance (No.2) Act 2015 is now on Westlaw UK with all amendments and commencement information.

Westlaw UK aims “to publish all new legislation the morning after publication, with new amendments highlighted within 48 hours. Case digests are written for the most influential cases on the day the judgment is delivered, with Status Icons of all the affected cases updated within 24 hours.”

Elaine Shallcross
Information Consultant, Law & Business
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk

The benefits of creating a Westlaw UK profile

Westlaw logo

Westlaw can help you to better organize your research. With a Westlaw profile
you can:

  • add documents to folders
  • email/print/download documents
  • create alerts
  • and use the Linkbuilder tool.

You can still access, email, print and download individual documents or result lists without a profile, but if you are planning to use Westlaw a lot, you will definitely benefit from the extra features that a profile offers.

Important:
Access to Westlaw UK should always be through Primo whether you are creating a profile or not. Login to Primo and go to the Find Databases tab at the top. Click on ‘W’ and scroll down until you reach Westlaw UK. Click on the link. The database might ask you to provide your University username and password, a process also known as
Shibboleth authentication.

To create a profile:

Once you are linked out to Westlaw (through Shibboleth authentication) you will see a smaller window with the heading ‘Log in to My Westlaw UK Profile’ prompting you to Log In or Skip.

Create profile final

1) Click on Create Profile. Provide your first name, last name and your email address and click on Create.
2)  Go back to your email to obtain your password. Login to your profile will be by           providing the email you registered with (as your username) and a password.
3) Enter your username and temporary password. When you sign in to My Westlaw UK for the first time, you’ll be asked to change your password to something more memorable. This needs to be between 6 and 25 digits long.

new password

Next thing you will see is this screen:

When you have finished setting up your profile and Log In, your name will appear at the top blue line. Westlaw will always suggest that you log in to your profile.

The benefits:

Adding documents to folders    Picture1

When you find a case, journal article or piece of legislation that is of interest to you, save it in a folder so you can go back to it later. How? Simply click on the Add to Folder icon on the right of the light blue line across the top of the screen. An Add to Folder menu will open. You can save the document in one of your existing folders, or, for first-time users: create a new folder by typing a name in the box and clicking on New Folder. Next time you login to Westlaw, you can visit your folders from the My Folders link at the very top of the screen (dark blue line). All of your saved documents will be there. A great way of organizing your findings!

Creating alerts     ALARM

If a specific case is of particular interest to you, you can create an alert for it and thus be informed of any changes; e.g. when its status changes, or when it gets referenced in a journal article, when it’s cited by another case, or when another case has been heard between the same parties on a different point of law. To create a Case Alert, go to the Case Analysis document, the full text or Graphical History and click on the Create Case Alert link at the top right hand corner of the screen. (Looks like an alarm clock.) You can also create an alert for a list of results from a specific search.

Click on Alerts (blue line at the top) to go back to your saved alerts and run a search again or edit it, or to change the way your alerts are set up!

And…

The Linkbuilder tool   linkbuilder

This feature allows you to create direct links to material on Westlaw UK. The links can include authentication; meaning that upon clicking on them, users will have to provide their University username and password. You can create and send links to result pages, individual documents or search templates.

To use this feature you need to have a profile with Westlaw. Next step is to contact Westlaw UK Customer Support Team on 0800 028 2200 or by email at:  customer.service@westlaw.co.uk and request access to the Linkbuilder tool.

To create a link:

1) Navigate to the document and click the Build Link icon on the top right hand corner of the screen. You will be presented with a link creation screen. (The Linkbuilder screen.) You can choose your method of authentication here:

2) For the University of Aberdeen authentication is via the entityID URL for Shibboleth. (Deselect the Save sponsor code option.)
Enter the following in the entityID URL box: https://shibserv.abdn.ac.uk/shibboleth and make sure the Save entityID URL box is ticked.

3) Click Copy to Clipboard at the bottom of the screen. The link is now ready to be pasted into any document. Remember that you can also ‘hide’ links under citations or words (in other words, linkify words or parts of text) if you are creating and publishing
material online.

Read this guide to find out more about the Linkbuilder tool.

Tip: If you skip logging in to your profile and later decide that you would like to use the extra features that a profile offers, the way to log in is by clicking on the Westlaw UK icon at the top left hand corner, then clicking on MyWestlaw to bring up the log in window! Your name will appear at the start of the blue ribbon at the top.

Remember to Log Out!

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For more information on using Westlaw UK, find our Library guides here.
Come and see us in person if you need help with Westlaw or any other legal database!

Eleni Borompoka
Taylor Library & EDC
01224 272601
eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

Isle of Man Legislation website is better than ever

For anyone wishing to look up Isle of Man legislation you may find the recent upgrade to the website of interest.

The Attorney General’s Chambers in the Isle of Man has announced the launch of the latest upgrade to the Isle of Man Legislation website. The new version is fully operational with effect from 16 March 2015. Included below is further information supplied by the Isle of Man Legislation Website Administrator, Jayne Hubble.

“The Isle of Man Legislation website provides free, open access to all current Acts of Tynwald consolidated to show all amendments. Their target is to publish the current Acts showing all amendments consolidated to the beginning of the previous month.

The upgraded site has a more modern appearance and has been optimised for smart phone and tablet compatibility. Other features of the upgraded site include:

  • Current Acts presented alphabetically or by subject
  • A point in time function allowing previous versions of Acts to be viewed
  • Table of changes made to Acts showing the source of amendments and the date they came into effect
  • All Acts published “as enacted” since 2001
  • All Acts repealed since September 2012
  • Improved search facility

There are also links to:

  • Current Isle of Man Orders in Council
  • Secondary Legislation
  • Social Security LegislationFuture improvements include the publication of Appointed Day Orders.”

Any queries concerning the website should be addressed to:
Jayne Hubble (Legislation Website Administrator)
e-mail: Jayne.hubble@attgen.gov.im
Telephone: 01624 685452

—-

Elaine Shallcross
Information Consultant, Law and Business
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk

New enhancements for legislation on Westlaw UK

Legislation Overview Enhancements:

Westlaw UK have merged the General Materials section with the Overview Document. With all the information in one place it’s now much easier to review  an Act or SI. Several new links have been added to give you access to even more relevant information:

  • ALL LEGISLATION CITING: provides details and links to every piece of legislation that cites and makes amendments to the Act or SI that you are interested in. View the content: by provision (chronological order), type of amendment (textual or non-textual, ordered by section) or by modification.
  • JOURNAL ARTICLES CITING: lists and links to all the journal articles that have been written about or referenced the Act or SI that you’re looking at.

Annotated Statutes Enhancements:

In addition to ‘Annotations for the Law in Force’, you can also view Annotations for ‘Law in Force’ versions, ‘Future’ versions and ‘Post-2007 superseded or repealed’ versions. Annotations will also be available for several significant pre-2007 versions selected by the editors.

Elaine Shallcross
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk