Tip of the Day: Citing cases in footnotes

OSCOLA final

  Did you know

… if the full name of the case is given in your text, it is not given in the footnote?

  For example:

Amongst Lord Reid’s cases where there seems to have been a late change of mind and vote include such famous cases as Rookes v Barnard47 White and Carter (Councils) Ltd v McGregor, 48 Anisminic Ltd v Foreign Compensation Commission, 49 Home Office
v Dorset Yacht Co,
 50 and Cassell v Broome. 51

  Footnote:

 (47) [1964] AC 1129.
 (48) [1961] UKHL 5.
 (49) [1969] 2 AC 147.
 (50) [1970] UKHL 2.
 (51) [1972] UKHL 3.

For more information, see pages 3-4 in OSCOLA user guide.

 Taylor Library Staff

Tip of the Day – Contributions to edited books

OSCOLA finalIf you are citing a chapter or essay in an edited book, follow the steps below:

  • Cite the author
  • ‘Title’ of the contribution
  • in editor (ed)
  • book title (in italics)
  • (additional information, publisher, year)

Remember that it is not necessary to give the pages of the contribution.

Example:

Justine Pila, ‘The Value of Authorship in the Digital Environment’ in William H Dutton and Paul W Jeffreys (eds), World Wide Research: Reshaping the Sciences and Humanities
in the Century of Information
(MIT Press 2010)

Tip! For more information, see page 35 in the OSCOLA user guide.

 

New instructional video: Finding law e-journal articles through Primo

Needing to find an online journal article but unsure where to start?
Why not watch our short video on finding law e-journal articles through Primo…

You can find it under the Instructional Material tab in our blog, or online through our youtube channel.

TaylorblogInstructionalMaterial

More videos on how to use the Taylor Library resources and facilities to come soon!

Just keep checking the list of our Instructional Material and hopefully you will find the right video to help you make the most of our library!

If you have any questions about this or any of our videos, please email lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Eleni Borompoka
Senior Information Assistant
Taylor Library and EDC
eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

Tip of the Day: OSCOLA – Bibliographies

OSCOLA final

 A bibliography lists all the secondary sources you cited in your essay or dissertation. It should be provided at the end of your work – after the main body of text, any appendices, and tables of primary sources that you have referred to.
Works in a bibliography are arranged in alphabetical order by the surname of
the first author.
Please note that references in a bibliography should include:
  • The author’s surname followed by his or her initial(s), with no comma
    separating them, but a comma after the final initial.
  • Only initials should be used.
  • Where there are more than 3 authors, give the first author followed by
    the phrase ‘and others’.
  • Titles of unattributed works should be preceded by a double em-dash
    (— — title of work).

——————————————————————————————

Examples

Citation in a footnote:
15 Elisabeth Fisher, Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism
(Hart Publishing 2007) 15.

Citation in the bibliography:
Fisher E, Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism
(Hart Publishing 2007).

For more information, see pages 11-12 in the OSCOLA User Guide or consult the Library’s quick guide on citing legal authorities.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

New Tip of the Day Service

TipWe are delighted to introduce a new service to help you make the most of the resources and services at Taylor Library. The ‘Tip of the Day’ service will be launched before the start of the next exam period.

From the middle of April, we will deliver useful tips to you regarding:

  • Library services
  • Legal databases
  • Other online resources (e-books, e-journals)
  • Official publications
  • Technical support
  • And much, much more…

We hope you will find this daily service advantageous for your study and research.

 

Taylor Library& EDC Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

Law essays and dissertations: citing resources with OSCOLA

The Oxford University Standard for Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA) is a system of legal citation that has been adopted by most law schools in the United Kingdom, including the University of Aberdeen’s School of Law.

If you are unsure about how to cite primary sources or struggle referencing electronic vs paper journals, there are several guides available online to help you:

OSCOLA (4th edn., Hart, 2012). A comprehensive guide to citing authorities, legislation, and other legal materials. A hard copy of the manual can be found in the reference section at the Taylor Library issue desk.
OSCOLA 2006: Citing International Law. OSCOLA (4th edn.) does not cover International Law.
• Library’s Quick Guide to OSCOLA. Contains examples of some of the most commonly cited legal sources.

If you prefer to use software to generate citations you may want to investigate EndNote or Citavi reference management packages that can support the OSCOLA referencing style. Please note that OSCOLA is not supported by RefWorks.

And remember, you can always email Elaine Shallcross or Nicola Will if you have a question or come and see us at the Taylor Library in person!

 

  Eleni Borompoka
  Senior Information Assistant
  Taylor Library and EDC
  eleni.boro@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

Revised 4th ed of OSCOLA published

Oxford law have published a revised 4th ed of their OSCOLA guide to legal citation. Following sections have been amended:

  • 2.1.7 – Judges’ names has been amended to say that all Supreme Court Justices are called Lord or Lady
  • 2.6.2 – now refers to the Judgments of the European Court of Justice and General Court, rather than the Court of First Instance
  • examples in sections 3.3.4, 3.4.1, 3.4.8 and 3.4.9 no longer include http:// in web addresses that begin with www

The revised version of OSCOLA (4th ed) can be found at http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/published/OSCOLA_4th_edn_Hart_2012.pdf.

Elaine Shallcross
e.shallcross@abdn.ac.uk