Tip of the Day: OSCOLA – Subsequent citation of a case

OSCOLA finalIn the following example, we demonstrate the subsequent citation of a case. The short form of the case name must be sufficient to identify the source.

If the full name of the case is given in the text e.g. AWB Limited v Honourable Terence Rhoderic Hudson Cole, the citation is provided in footnotes as follows:

74 [2006] FCA 571.

76 AWB Limited (n. 74).

Interpreting the footnotes:

74 As the name of the case is given in your text, it is not given in the footnote.

76 For subsequent citation, a short form of the case is sufficient to identify the source along with a cross-citation to the full citation.

Note that it is also acceptable to give the full citation every time a source is cited, and the Law School may prefer this to the use of short forms. Always consult your supervisor or course coordinator if you are uncertain about referencing and citing using OSCOLA.

For more information, see Page 5 in the OSCOLA user guide. For more OSCOLA examples, please follow the link here.

Taylor Library Staff
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

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Accessing your personal filespace (H:) remotely

When using a classroom PC you can save files to the H: drive, which is your personal and secure filespace in the university network. Documents and files saved there can be retrieved from any PC on campus. But what happens when you work from home and need to access a file that is saved on your H: drive?

The VPN (Virtual Private Network) provides remote access through your own computer to your filespace on the university server when you are at home, or use your laptop at a wireless spot, on campus or in the halls.

To remotely access a file saved on your H: drive, open your web browser and login to the VPN with your University of Aberdeen username and password.
https://remote.abdn.ac.uk

vpn screenThe first time you login on your personal computer you must install the Aventail Access Manager. This is a one-time process that will set you up with the components for accessing the network and keeping up to date. Just follow the onscreen instructions or read our user guidelines.

To access shared network space, email your request to sevicedesk@abdn.ac.uk, with the subject ‘Remote VPN: request access to shared filespace’.

Note: Access to your H: drive through VPN is recommended when you need to retrieve files remotely. For more advanced actions such as remotely saving new documents to your H: drive, accessing Library databases and using MS Office and other programmes off-campus use the university’s Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). For more information on the VDI see our tip ‘Essential route to accessing some legal databases off campus. The Virtual Desktop Infrastructure‘.

Any questions, come and speak to us!

 

Printing and binding your dissertation

Printing in the Library
When you are ready to print your work:

  1. Open the document and click on the FILE tab at the top left hand side of the screen.
  2. Choose Print. This will bring up the printing menu.

Colour printer

 

 

3. Make sure to choose
COLOUR-pull-pcl on class-print.uoa.abdn.ac.uk
to print in colour.

If you only wish to print certain pages in colour, specify the range in Settings. (Remember to retrieve the job from the colour printer. In Taylor Library, this is the far end MFD in the photocopy area.)

 

 

 

 

4. Still in Settings, set the printer to One Sided if you wish so. The default setting is Print on Both Sides. You also have options for defining the size, orientation and margins of your document, as well as the number of pages per sheet.

  • Printing charges for black & white or colour can be found here.
  • See our other posts: printing single-sided and printing one item from a printing queue. Remember that once a document has been sent to the printer, no changes can
    be made!

The Print Shop
For even better printing quality, you can discuss the available printing options with staff at The Print Shop. The Print Shop is located on the ground floor of The Sir Duncan Rice Library, behind the steps leading to Special Collections. You will be required to submit your dissertation or thesis printout or send it by email (in one PDF) and staff will email you back with the cost for printing and binding. If the file is too large, you can use ZendTo or Dropbox.

  • Charges for printing are 6p per page for black & white and 35p per page for colour 80gsm A4. For more details and options click here.

The Print Shop offers a number of binding options for dissertations and theses:

  • For soft binding, see options and prices here. Dissertation soft binding can take from 30 minutes to a couple of hours depending on the volume of orders. Thesis soft binding can take a day or two.
  • Hard binding of theses when binding up to 2 copies costs £29.70 each, or £26.95 each from 3 copies and above. In your email, remember to state the number of copies you need and the hard cover colour. (Black, navy blue, maroon or green.) Hard binding takes about a week to be completed; date and time for collection will be offered once staff have your affirmative reply. (Completion times are subject to change at the discretion of the departments involved.) More information on hard binding here.
theses

hard binding – image taken from UniPrint

Useful links
Print Shop and UniPrint
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/documents/guides/gen/qggen025.pdf

Submission of research theses
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/documents/guides/gen/qggen009.pdf

♦♦♦

Please speak to a member of staff at the Taylor Library if you need help with printing on the MFDs or, get in touch with staff at The Print Shop if your query relates to printing and binding.

Taylor Library
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk
01224 272601

The Print Shop
printshop@abdn.ac.uk
01224 272578

Many thanks to Kostas Papadopoulos for all the information on the printing and binding services offered by The Print Shop and UniPrint!

 

 

Tip of the Day: OSCOLA -Table of cases (EU cases)

OSCOLA final

Our series of blog posts on OSCOLA aim to help you navigate through the complex and sometimes confusing rules of this referencing style. This time we concentrated on EU cases organising them in tables at the end of your work.

TIP! If you divide your table of cases by jurisdiction:

  • list European Court of Justice (ECJ), General Court (GC) – previously known as Court of First Instance (CFI) – and Commission decisions separately,
  • in chronological or numerical order,
  • cite the cases as in footnotes, with the case number first, but omitting the
    word ‘Case’.

EU cases have been given the prefix C– (for ECJ cases) or T– (for GC cases).

Example

C-280/92 Spain v the Commission [1994] ECR I-4103
C–176/03 Commission v Council [2005] ECR I–7879
C-39/94 SFEI v La Poste [2006] ECR I-3547

T–344/99 Arne Mathisen AS v Council [2002] ECR II–2905
T-396/08 Freistaat Sachsen und Land Sachsen-Anhalt v Commission [2010] ECR II-141,
T-29/05 Deltafina v Commission [2010] ECR II-4077

Tip! If not listed separately in your table of cases, EU cases should be arranged alphabetically by first party name, followed by the case number in brackets.

Example

Cite the ‘Case T-344/99 Arne Mathisen AS v Council [2012] ECR II-2905’ in the table of cases under letter ‘A’:

  • Arne Mathisen AS v Council (T-344/99) [2012] ECR II-2905

For more information, see pages 10 – 11 and 30 – 31 in the OSCOLA user guide or our library guide on OSCOLA .

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

How copyright works – photocopying, scanning and downloading

copyright 1

Would you like to scan, photocopy or download library items but you are worried about
copyright violation?

Please, consult this quick guide, which explains the main categories of works currently protected in the UK, and the limits of photocopying, scanning or downloading.

The main categories of works covered by copyright:

  • Original literary works such as novels or poems, journal articles, letters, tables, lists and webpages
  • Typographical arrangements (i.e. the layout or actual appearance) of published editions
  • Original dramatic works such as opera, musical theatre dance or mime
  • Original musical works, i.e. the musical notes themselves
  • Original artistic works such as graphic works, paintings, drawings, photographs, jewellery, sculptures, maps, plans, blueprints and technical drawings
  • Sound recordings
  • Films
  • Broadcasts
  • Computer programmes and databases
  • Crown Copyright
  • Parliamentary Copyright

Under fair dealing, a general rule of thumb is that you can copy:

  • One chapter or 5% of a book, whichever is the greater
  • One complete article from a single issue of a journal
  • Up to 10% (maximum 200 pages) of a short book, pamphlet or report
  • One law report from a volume of judicial proceedings
  • One paper from a set of conference proceedings
  • A maximum of 10 pages or 5% of a poem, short story or other short literary work taken from an anthology of poetry or short stories

Remember that copyright violators are pursued vigorously by the right holders.

For more information, please visit our webpages on Copyright and read our library guide, Introduction to copyright.

If you have any question or you need assistance, please visit us in the Taylor Library & EDC.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

Tip of the Day: Forgotten ID cards

forgotten cards

© Flood G. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

As a university member, you always need your ID card to enter the library. So, what happens if you leave it at home?

You have to request a Day Access Pass.  We will ask you to provide proof of identity and to fill in the necessary form. Remember, you will be allowed a Day Access Pass on 3 separate occasions in an academic year. Thereafter you must have your University ID card to visit us.

For more information, please read the Library Access Policy.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

OSCOLA – Tables and lists

OSCOLA final

Tip! You should always consult your course coordinator regarding the requirement to include tables of primary legal materials in your work. However, the general rule is that shorter works, such as articles and essays, only require footnotes.

At the end of a longer work (e.g. book, dissertation or thesis) you have to include the followings in this order:

  • List of abbreviations
  • Tables:
    • table(s) of cases
    • table(s) of legislation
    • tables other primary legal resources
  • Bibliography of secondary resources

As this post concentrates on the Tables only, you can find useful tips and a few examples here.

Table of cases

  • Cases should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word (except EU cases if they are divided by jurisdiction).
  • Case names are not italicized.
  • Unless there is a very small number of cases, divide the table into separate sections for different jurisdictions.

Example:
Assange v Sweden [2012] UKSC 22, [2012] 2 AC 471
Brightcrew Ltd. V City of Glasgow Licensing Board [2011] CSIH 46, 2012 SC 67
De Keyser’s Royal Hotel, Re [1920] AC 508
Hunter v Fox 1964 SC (HL) 95

Table of legislation

  • List every statute cited in your work. Legislation should be listed in alphabetical order of first significant word of the title (not chronologically by date of enactment!)
  • Statutory Instruments should be listed separately, at the end of the statues. But, if you have a large number of citations of statutory instruments, it may be helpful to have wholly separate tables of statues and statutory instruments.
  • If legislation from more than one jurisdiction is cited, it may be helpful to have separate lists for each jurisdiction.

Example:
Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 12)
Defamation Act 2013
Fur Farming (Prohibition) Act 2000
High Hedges (Scotland) Act 2013 (asp 6)
Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977

Civil Legal Aid (Costs) Regulations 2013, SI 2013/611
Act of Sederunt (Lands Valuation Appeal Court) 2013, SSI 2013/161
Zoonoses (Monitoring) (Scotland) Regulations 2007, SSI 2007/420

Other tables

  • Table of international treaties and conventions,
  • Table of UN documents,
  • Table of official papers,
  • Table of policy documents.

For more information, please see pp. 10-12 in the OSCOLA user guide.

Taylor Library Team
lawlib@abdn.ac.uk