Taylor Library – new opening hours

In the new academic year, Taylor Library is open for registered university staff and students only with a reduced capacity of 130 study spaces.

Our current opening hours:

Monday – Friday 09:00 – 20:00
Saturday 13:00 – 17:00
Sunday 13:00 – 17:00

Please be aware that we are operating under unprecedented circumstances in the middle of a pandemic, and that there are strict rules we all have to follow:

  • Wear face covering or lanyard all the time
  • Keep the 2 m distance from others
  • Bring only bottled water into the library (NO other food or drink permitted)
  • Use hand sanitiser on entry and exit
  • Observe the one way system while using our staircases
  • Place any handled books that are not borrowed on the trolleys provided
  • Clean desks, MFDs and PCs after use

Let’s all work together to keep Taylor Library open.

You can always check the current library occupancy here.

If you have any questions or would like to contact us, please email at lawlib@abdn.ac.uk.

Taylor Library Team

Good luck with your exams

student-in-library-with-laptop

© CollegeDegrees360. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

As law exams start from today, we would like to wish you all the best. We hope you are well and well prepared for the exams. During revision time, quite a few of you asked about online resources. You know very well how to access e-books and electronic journals through Primo, but not everybody is aware of the fact that more and more publishers give us free access to their academic collections. This means that there are more law resources available online than before. This post will highlight a few notable collections:

Bloomsbury Professional

The publisher, Bloomsbury Professional, has given us free access to the following law textbooks:

  • Gretton & Steven: Property Trusts & Succession
  • MacQueen & Thomson: Contract law in Scotland
  • Thomson: Family Law in Scotland
  • Dewart & MacQueen; Studying Scots Law
  • Himsworth & O’Neill: Scotland’s Constitution Law & Practice
  • Guthrie: Social Work Law in Scotland

Please email us at lawlib@abdn.ac.uk for the link to the collection and for username and password.

Oxford Law Trove

Another important resource is Oxford Law Trove, which is Oxford University Press’s online platform for law textbooks. You can get temporary access to more than 190 titles there.

To access this collection, follow this link to the Library’s web page at:
  1. On the library page, go to the Temporary Access to Additional E-Resources section.
  2. Scroll down to Oxford Law Trove, and click on the arrow next to the title.
  3. Follow the link provided in that section to log in to the collection.
  4. On the publishers’ login page, check the left hand side of the screen under the Law Trove logo, and in the pale blue login box, click on Sign in via your Institution.
  5. On the next page, find and select University of Aberdeen.
  6. An authentication box will appear, and you will need to enter your university IT username and password to log in to Law Trove.

Within the collection:
– You can click on the Subject tab (on the top left of the screen, under the Law Trove logo) to see the different categories there,
– or, you can use the Search box in the top right corner of the screen.

Westlaw UK

Finally, do not forget that there are law textbooks available on Westlaw UK. The route to the Westlaw UK database is the same as it was: through Primo.  Once you have logged in, click on the arrow next to the Westlaw logo (on the top left corner of the screen), and select Books from the drop-down menu. On the Westlaw Books page, browse through the 336 book titles available to you.

Starting today, you will have a few days to finish your law exam questions online. If you need further help with accessing or using databases or the above mentioned collections, please contact us at lawlib@abdn.ac.uk.

Taylor Library Team 

 

Understanding citations – CASES

  1. INTERPRETING CASE CITATIONS

GENERAL RULES

What does case citation mean?

Case citation is a system of referencing by which legal professionals can identify a legal case heard and decided by one of the courts in the UK.
A full case citation starts with the Case name in italics followed by the neutral citation (where available) and/or the reference for  law report series where the case was published. The citation tells you where to find the case (in paper or online) if you need it.
For cases from Scottish and English courts, the citation usually has 3 distinct parts:

  • year
  • abbreviation (for the law report series in which the case was published)
  • page number.

Parallel citations

You may see more than one citation following the party names. These are parallel citations, and refer you to the case in different law report series. You do not need to find all the law reports which published the case to read it. You should use the most authoritative citation which is the first one right after the party names. Parallel citations offer an opportunity to find a case in different law reports if the library does not have the most authoritative source.

Neutral citations (case identifiers)

The neutral citations were introduced in the UK in 2001, and in Scotland in 2005. This system means that decisions of the superior courts in both Scotland and England are issued with unique judgement numbers. So, the last number after the abbreviation is not a page number but the identifier of the case.

courts-1

ANATOMY OF A CASE CITATION

scottish-cases

english-cases

neutral-citation

*Law reports are usually cited by abbreviation rather than the full title. Cardiff Index to Legal Abbreviations can help you understand the meaning of abbreviations for the titles of English language legal publications.

2. TRACKING DOWN CASES ON PAPER AND ONLINE

Law reports are available on paper in Block C and Block D of the Taylor Library. They are shelved by title in alphabetical order running down the right hand side of the lower level of the Library. The current parts of law reports are on the display stand near the entrance. All law reports are for reference use only.

For electronic versions of the law reports you have to consult the legal databases (Westlaw, Lexis Library, HeinOnline). Alternatively, you might want to check Primo, our resource discovery tool, for individual law report titles. (Do a ‘title search’ instead of a search by citation.) Please note that not all years are available for all law reports.
For more information on accessing and using legal databases, please read our library guides.

3. PRINCIPAL SERIES OF LAW REPORTS

SCOTLAND (this is not a comprehensive list of resources)

  • Session Cases (SC)
  • Scots Law Times (SLT)
  • Scottish Civil Law Reports (SCLR)
  • Scottish Criminal Case Reports (SCCR)
  • Scottish Criminal Law (SCL)
  • Green’s Weekly Digest (GWD)

ENGLAND (this is not a comprehensive list of resources)

  • The Law Reports

4 subseries within The Law Reports:

Appeal Cases (AC)
Chancery Division (CH)
Family (Fam)
Queen’s Bench (QB)*

  • Weekly Law Reports (WLR)
  • All England Law Reports (All ER)

*It can be King’s Bench (KB) – it changes with the monarch.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please visit the library or email us.

Taylor Library & EDC
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

Lexis Library: News & International collections unavailable

Lexis Library’s News and International Materials collections have been moved to a new platform. Unfortunately at the moment we are unable to access this content. If you require a specific document held in either of these collections, please email the Library at library@abdn.ac.uk. Please include details of the item(s) you require and your contact details.

The Library is in contact with Lexis Library and we hope to regain access to this content soon. Please note that all other collections within Lexis Library are unaffected.

Welcome to the Law Library

Welcome photo

The library team welcomes all new and returning students to Taylor Library. Once you’ve admired our brilliant new carpet, please wander around the shelves and check what we can offer to you.

The new book shelf is full with items acquired over the summer. The latest parts of the legal journals and law reports can be seen on our display unit. We have tidied the periodicals, the law report collection, as well as the general law book collection upstairs, and we are happy to report that quiet a few missing items were found, though not everything.

As a modern academic library, we can offer not only paper resources but e-books, e-journals and access to quite a few mainstream legal databases

Please follow the links, if you need information on library servicesfacilities and law resourcesOur guides provide quick help for any kind of library or resource related problems.

We are looking forward to seeing many of you in the library soon, and wishing you all the best of luck in the 2017/18 academic year.

Taylor Library Team
 lawlib@abdn.ac.uk

 

New Carpets for Taylor Library – update

The carpet replacement project in Taylor Library has been completed. All areas of the library, including the computer and project rooms, are now open to students, staff and visitors.

Furthermore, new general waste and recycling bins have been installed throughout the library, including 3 waste & liquids bins.new carpets.png
It is our aim to provide a harmonious study environment for all users at all times.
Please help us to achieve this.

Enjoy using your library!

 

Access to Lexis Library

We are currently experiencing difficulty accessing Lexis Library through Primo. Lexis Library are looking into the problem.

In the meantime the database can still be accessed in the following way:

  1. Click on the link below:
    https://www.lexisnexis.com/start/shib/wayf?viewAllInstitutions=yes&appToken=43FF9DC93354C583BBD978A5FE0E2211
  2. Select University of Aberdeen from the list.
  3. You may be asked to provide your university username and password.

We will make a further announcement once we hear more from Lexis Library. We apologize for the inconvenience this may be causing.

 

Taylor Library Heavy Demand drop-box

dropbox

The Taylor Library self return machine

As exams approach and the Library gets busier we’d like to remind students of the Heavy Demand drop-box, in to which you can return any Taylor Heavy Demand items you have prior to our opening at 9am. The box is placed outside the Taylor Library entrance at around 7:30am every weekday. This is to give you as much opportunity to return HD items before the 10:30am due time as possible. Late Heavy Demand items will accrue an immediate fine of 75p. After one hour this will increase by a further 75p, and will continue to do so for each subsequent hour the item is late. Nobody wants the added stress of library fines at this or any time of year. Help us help you avoid them by making use of the drop-box!

Best of luck with the exams and keep your money for the pub when they’re finished!

 

Unattended items in the study area

laptop-mit

© Chris Devers. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

We understand the desire to keep your study space when using the library at this time of year. However please be aware that the maximum length of time it is acceptable to leave your space with unattended personal items is 30 minutes, as per library regulation 5.5. Items left longer than this maybe taken to the staff office to await collection. There is heavy competition for study spaces at this time of year and this is the fairest way to minimize frustration for everyone. Please remember that if you do choose to leave any belongings in the library, you do so at your own risk. Any questions please ask a member of staff.

Thanks

Taylor staff.

Accessing your personal filespace (H:) remotely

When using a classroom PC you can save files to the H: drive, which is your personal and secure filespace in the university network. Documents and files saved there can be retrieved from any PC on campus. But what happens when you work from home and need to access a file that is saved on your H: drive?

The VPN (Virtual Private Network) provides remote access through your own computer to your filespace on the university server when you are at home, or use your laptop at a wireless spot, on campus or in the halls.

To remotely access a file saved on your H: drive, open your web browser and login to the VPN with your University of Aberdeen username and password.
https://remote.abdn.ac.uk

vpn screenThe first time you login on your personal computer you must install the Aventail Access Manager. This is a one-time process that will set you up with the components for accessing the network and keeping up to date. Just follow the onscreen instructions or read our user guidelines.

To access shared network space, email your request to sevicedesk@abdn.ac.uk, with the subject ‘Remote VPN: request access to shared filespace’.

Note: Access to your H: drive through VPN is recommended when you need to retrieve files remotely. For more advanced actions such as remotely saving new documents to your H: drive, accessing Library databases and using MS Office and other programmes off-campus use the university’s Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). For more information on the VDI see our tip ‘Essential route to accessing some legal databases off campus. The Virtual Desktop Infrastructure‘.

Any questions, come and speak to us!